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Linking Technologies
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1.
Anick Jesdanun discusses the controversy of deep linking. (The Kansas City Star 7 June 2002)
2.
Walt Crawford says OpenURL helps users get from information about articles and books they want, to the article text or journal and book holdings you have. (RLG News June 2002 #56).
3.
ALA provided links to web pages which discuss deep linking.
4.
Gloria Rohmann describes the means to match users with resources they encounter in catalogs and information services. (RLG Focus June 2002 #56).
5.
Amy Brand and Kristen Fisher explore recent shifts in linking that promise more benefits for the researcher. (Research Information Spring 2003)
6.
Jill E. Grogg and Christine L. Ferguson describe Ex Libris and SFX, LinkfinderPlus, 1Cate, Journal Finder and other linking technologies. (Searcher 11(2) February 2003)
7.
Andrea Powell writes that for a secondary database publisher, the imperative to provide seamless links between the bibliographic citations and the corresponding full text is unequivocal. Online publishing should, in theory, make this linkage easier to facilitate, but the reality is far more complex than the theory! CABI Publishing has been endeavouring continually to improve the linkage to full text offered by its bibliographic databases, and has encountered some obstacles which may not be immediately apparent to primary publishers. This article explains some of those obstacles and provides some insight into how secondary publishers are attempting to respond to the demands of the marketplace and the potential of online publishing. (Learned Publishing 15(4) October 2002)
8.
LinkOut provides a library the advantage of linking its patrons from a PubMed citation directly to the full-text of an article after a library submits its electronic holdings data to NCBI.
9.
Jon Udell describes a bookmarklet that can parse the ISBN number from the URL of an Amazon, or B&N, or isbn.nu, or other book-related site; issue a query to your local library; and open a new browser window onto the result of that query. At a single stroke, one-click lookup from a central book site to the local library can be available to all your patrons. More on this at http://www.topica.com/lists/fos-forum/read/message.html?mid=906164969&sort=d&start=534
10.
A Current Awareness Weblog for the information community from nfais.
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